ArtWay

We Christ-followers need an understanding of playfulness if we are going to take sanctification by the Holy Spirit seriously. Calvin Seerveld

Travel Tips

England

England

From south to north
 
Bosham:
- Holy Trinity Bosham has an altar tapestry from 2008 by Mark Cazalet.
 
Chichester:                                                                                                                                                 
- Chichester Cathedral is a magnificent building which has stood at the centre of Chichester for nearly 1000 years.  A wonderful combination of the ancient and the modern, it holds a number of treasures including the 12th-century Lazarus. Works by Sutherland, Chagall, Cecil Collins and John Piper (tapestry).
 
Ditchling (East Sussex):                                                                                                                    
- Ditchling Museum. Houses a collection of the many artists and craftspeople who lived and worked in the village of Ditchling, including Eric Gill, who formed the Guild of St Joseph and St Dominic. Other artists' work on display includes David Jones, Bernard Leach, Frank Brangwyn, Ethel Mairet and Edward Johnston, designer of the typeface used by London Underground. www.ditchling-museum.com
 
Winchester:
- Cathedral. Also has exhibitions.
 
Salisbury:
- Sarum College promotes the arts in a number of  ways, including its popular Sarum Lunchtime Concerts as well as both permanent and temporary art exhibitions. www.sarum.ac.uk
 
Guildford:
- Cathedral. Also has exhibitions.
 
West Ham:
- Commission4mission exhibition space at All Saints West Ham showing work by Commission4mission members. http://commissionformission.blogspot.com   
 
London:                                                                                                                                              
- Westminster Cathedral, catholic cathedral, opened in 1903, built in the Byzantine style. With Eric Gill’s Stations of the Cross. 
- Sacred Space Gallery, London. This gallery is dedicated to the sacred and traditional arts from divers world traditions. It also welcomes contemporary artists who do not belong to any tradition per se, but choose to explore the sacred in their work. Sacred Space is situated in the specially refitted northern transept of St John’s Notting Hill, London. 
- Notre Dame de France, the Roman Catholic Francophone Chaplaincy in London run by the Marist Fathers, Leicester Place, London. The original building was bombed out in the 1940s and almost entirely rebuilt from 1953-55 with contributions by eminent French artists of the time such as Georges-Laurent Saupique (base relief carving of Our Lady of Mercy, 1953), Boris Anrep (Mosaic of the Nativity, 1954) and Jean Cocteau (murals). 
- The Temple Gallery, 6 Clarendon Cross, Holland Park, London: a centre for the study, restoration and exhibition of ancient icons and sacred art. www.templegallery.com 
- Art in Faith. The Art of Faith walk is the second Art Trail created through the work of commission4mission. commission4mission members Mark Lewis and Jonathan Evens researched the Art of Faith walk produced by the Corporation of London with the support of the Diocese of London. This walk enables walkers to discover contemporary works of art in the City’s historic churches, including work by Henry Moore, Damien Hirst and Jacob Epstein.  http://www.chelmsford.anglican.org/uploads/Barking_Art_trail.pdf
 
Chelmsford:
- Chelmsford Cathedral with ‘The Tree of Life’ window (2003) by Mark Cazalet.
 
Goodmayes:
- St Paul’s has stained glass by Sir Edward Burne-Jones, William Morris, and Leonard Evetts, a Madonna and Child by Jane Quail and Stations of the Crown off Thorns by Henry Shelton (2010).
 
Cookham:
- Stanley Spencer Gallery. Spencer (1891–1959) was born and lived in the Thames-side village of Cookham in Berkshire. The Methodist Chapel in Cookham, which he attended, is now the Stanley Spencer Gallery, a gallery dedicated to his art. Many of his works depict villagers and village life and his religious paintings often had Cookham as their backdrop. Not far from the gallery is "Fernlea", the cottage where Spencer was born and lived in Cookham High Street. www.stanleyspencer.org.uk
 
Burghclere:
- Sandham Memorial Chapel, south-west of Cookham. Chapel in memory of World War I with murals by Stanley Spencer.
 
Near Cirencester (Gloucestershire):      
The Lodge Studio: gallery, courses, talks and refreshment weeks at the home of David and Ali Thistlethwaite near Cirencester, Gloucestershire, is a unique and inspiring setting for creative work. www.artinthecountry.co.uk
 
Oxford:                                                                                                                                           
- Art Jericho. Named after Jericho, the district in Oxford where the building can be found, the new gallery will host other exhibitions and seminars, slideshows and talks, some in association with the Centre for Faith & Culture, located upstairs in the same building (at 6a King Street). http://artjericho.com
                                                                                                                                                                         
Iffley (near Oxford):    
- St. Mary’s: Windows by John Piper, one of which is the Nativity Window that reaches back to an old tradition, apparent in medieval Christmas liturgy and poetry, in which animals take part in the nativity story. The Tree of Life window designed by Roger Wagner was installed in 2012.
 
Witney (near Oxford):
- The Meller Gallery is at the hub of the Veritasse company. The gallery adjoins the lovely Church Green in Witney. With Art Café. www.veritasse.co.uk
 
Warden Hill:
- St Christopher's has a set of ten stained glass windows designed and executed by Thomas Denny DA, each based upon a parable from the Gospels. The windows are also linked by colour, with the colours from each window carrying over into adjacent ones. www.tciwh.org.uk/index.php?page=windows 
 
Romford (Essex):
- St Albans church with Stations of the Cross by Charles Gurrey, Christus Rex by Peter Eugene Ball, Windows by Patrick Reyntiens and ceiling mural by Marc Cazalet.
 
Ely:
- The Stained Glass Museum. Offers a unique insight into the fascinating story of stained glass, an art-form that has been practised in Britain for at least thirteen hundred years. The Museum is in the South Transept of Ely Cathedral in Cambridgeshire, a small city 15 miles north of Cambridge. Also on display is work by Morris & Co. 20th Century work includes pieces by John Piper, Brian Clarke and Evie Hone famous for work at Eton College Chapel.
www.stainedglassmuseum.com 
 
Horsham St Faith (Norfolk):  
- A most quintessential of English villages, displaying a genuine Norfolk character with deep roots. Of the Benedictine monastery the monks' refectory still remains, and contains its original 13th-century wall painting - the only one of this type in England.
 
Little Witchingham (Norfolk): 
- In the church one of the finest sets of wall paintings in Norfolk. They appear to date from the first half of the 14th century.
 
Lincoln:
- The cathedral is one of the most beautiful gothic churches in Europe. Also expositions. www.lincolncathedral.com
 
Manchester:                                                                                                                                              
- St. Mary's, Norman Adams Fourteen Stations of the Cross. Norman Adams considered them to be the greatest work of his life.
- Modern churches in Manchester: Manchester Cathedral, St Michael and All Angels, Northern Moor, William Temple Church, Wythenshawe, Holy Rosary, Limeside Oldham, All Saints and Martyrs, Middleton.
 
Liverpool:
- Catholic Cathedral Christ the King in Liverpool, built after World war II. Round church. The walls inside have a pattern of abstract windows and banners.
 
Clayworth (Nottinghamshire):  
- Scottish artist Phoebe Anna Traquair (1852-1936) painted the murals in the choir of the Church of St. Peter at Clayworth. These murals, the largest single work of art in the East of England, cover all four walls of the Church.
 
Durham:
- the Cathedral, on the world heritage list.
- the chapel of Auckland Castle with a series of portrets of the 12 apostles by the Spanish Baroque painter Francisco de Zurbaran.
 
Wreay:                                                                                                                                 
- St. Mary‘s Church. St Mary’s was built between 1840 and 1842 under the personal direction of Sara Losh. She based the form of the church on a Roman basilica, a rectangular nave with a semicircular apse, a building type that was used by the first Christians for worship. Within this simple building Sara created a highly original work – the product of her exuberant imagination. The church is full of symbolic ornament and carvings some of which Sara carried out herself. St Mary’s embodies many of the attributes of the Arts and Crafts Movement and yet predates it by some 50 years.  http://www.stmaryswreay.org/
 
Also see: Irving Hexham, Christian Travelers Guide to Great Britain. http://www.christian-travelers-guides.com/